Medtronic

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Catching up with July

Well as I expected, lots has been happening in the diabetes tech world while I’ve been away working on the African photographic expedition. So this post is a little bit of a catch-up. Ryzodeg At the start of August the Australian PBS was updated to include Novo’s Ryzodeg insulin. Although Novo’s long-acting Tresiba is not …

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What’s a container of insulin called?

Insulin is supplied in three forms of container: Vials. Usually containing 10 ml each. Pen cartridges. Usually containing 3 ml each. Novo calls these “PenFill”: that is trademarked and not appropriate for other makes. Pre-filled disposable pens. Again usually containing 3 ml each. Note that the currently-accepted spelling is “vial”. “Phial” is a very archaic …

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When is a 670G not a 670G?

Most people interested in insulin pumps will by now be aware of the Medtronic 670G pump (sometimes mistakenly labelled as an “artificial pancreas”). This pump is the first commercial pump with basic hybrid closed-loop functionality, and was released in the US in 2017. There has been much discussion of when the 670G will be coming …

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Pump cannulae and infusion sets: what are the differences?

Cannulae (the plural form of “cannula”) are the tubes we stick into ourselves to infuse insulin from our pumps. They’re either made of steel or flexible teflon. Some go straight in (90˚) and are available in 6 or 9 mm lengths. Some are a lot longer. Today 6 mm is a common recommendation, although longer …

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