cannula

Filling a cannula

As an insulin pump user, when we insert a new cannula we usually need to tell the pump to “fill” it to ensure that insulin deliveries are accurate. After rewinding and priming the pump reservoir and filling the tubing, the cannula is inserted into the skin. The teflon cannula starts off with an introducer needle down …

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Cleo 90 infusion set – forgotten but not gone?

The Cleo 90 is an infusion set for insulin pumps which is available through Australia’s NDSS, but seems to have been forgotten by many people. Since 2010 I’ve used a variety of infusion sets with my pumps. The Animas Inset II (and the equivalent Medtronic Mio) and the Animas Comfort (and the matching Medtronic Silhouette). …

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Pump cannulae and infusion sets: what are the differences?

Cannulae (the plural form of “cannula”) are the tubes we stick into ourselves to infuse insulin from our pumps. They’re either made of steel or flexible teflon. Some go straight in (90˚) and are available in 6 or 9 mm lengths. Some are a lot longer. Today 6 mm is a common recommendation, although longer …

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Dual cannulas

Those of us who use insulin pumps are very used to dealing with cannulas. The pump is connected by tubing to a cannula inserted into the skin. We have to replace this cannula with a fresh one every 2-3 days (both to avoid infections and to stop insulin absorption slowing down). Everyone using a pump …

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